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Baby Insurance Commercial Question & Answers

2014 July 26
by Sarah Fields

Thomas asks…

What song is on this commercial (kind of a pay it forward commercial)?

I’m really sorry but I’m not sure about the words or the actual commercial.

But it’s a song on a commercial about either financial planning or insurance.

The commercial shows random acts of kindness (kind of a pay it forward), including a woman pushing someone out of the way of a moving vehicle, a person holding an elevator door, the person at the end gives a baby bottle to a baby in the stroller that dropped the bottle).

I love the song, does anyone know what song this is???
No the commercial had nothing to do with volkswagon. It was for a financial or insurance business.
A person just sent me the correct answer

Message: Hi Searcher –
I accidently deleted my answer when I wanted to modify it.. but here’s the answer anyway.

I researched and found that the commerical is from Liberty Mutual and the song is “Half Acre” by Hem.

I only wish I could give you the 10 points!!
A person just sent me the correct answer

Message: Hi Searcher –
I accidently deleted my answer when I wanted to modify it.. but here’s the answer anyway.

I researched and found that the commerical is from Liberty Mutual and the song is “Half Acre” by Hem.

I only wish I could give you the 10 points!!

Sarah Fields answers:

“Half Acre” by HEM

The commercial is for Liberty Mutual

Robert asks…

Why do companies waste money on annoying ads?

The talking baby, the bank with the vikings, the caveman for the insurance company…when are they going to realize that it turns us away from their product?

Sarah Fields answers:

Even if you don’t personally like the ads, they must be working or they would not keep running them. Commercials are rigorously tested before they are run, and sales analysed during the run. If they didn’t work they would be pulled.

Maria asks…

How did the governments role in the economy change from the beginning/end of the Great Depression?

The question is basically as put. I have a history test tomorrow, and I cannot fail!
“How did the government’s role in the economy change from the beginning of the Great Depression to the end of the GD?

Sarah Fields answers:

The government enacted several key pieces of legislation that established institutions still in existence today in response to the Great Depression.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) was created during the Great Depression to prevent a recurrence of the phenomenon of individuals losing their whole life savings from a bank failure. The FDIC is still in existence today and insures deposits up to $100,000. In late 2008, the limit was raised to $250,000.

The Social Security Act is one of the most well-known effects of the Great Depression. It is a very controversial institution nowadays with the sheer population size of baby boomers who are on track to retire.

The Glass-Steagall Act was passed in 1933 to compartmentalize the functions of banks. Under the Act, there were two types of banks recognized: commercial and investment banks. Each had its own allowed functions. For example, commercial banks could give out loans and charge interest but could not do things such as underwrite (guarantee) securities sold on the open market or advise corporations on mergers and acquisitions. Similarly, financial institutions recognized as investment banks could underwrite securities and advise businesses on mergers and acquisitions but could not give out loans to individuals and charge interest on them. It is interesting to note that when the real estate bubble was taking off, the business of securitizing mortgages was a big factor in making the bubble get bigger. Banks wanted in on the action and called for the repeal of Glass-Steagall. It is interesting to note that many of the practices that led to the current recession were prevalent in the years leading up to the Great Depression.

The Securities Exchange Commission was formed under Great Depression-era legislation. The objective of this institution was to add structure to the financial markets. Activities such as insider trading were outlawed under Securities Exchange Acts. Also, companies that sold stock publicly on the open market were required to issue a prospectus to prospective investors with a detailed disclaimer of holding stock in that company.

The Federal Reserve is blamed by some economists for making the Great Depression worse than it already was by not doing enough to increase the money supply. Deflation became problematic during the Great Depression. A way of reducing deflation is to increase the money supply. Even though low consumer spending puts downward pressure on inflation, supply pressures are removed when the money supply is increased. That is part of the reason why Ben Bernanke and the Fed cut interest rates to record lows to prevent a deflationary spiral.

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