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Health Insurance Exchange Question & Answers

2014 April 18
by Sarah Fields

William asks…

Is health insurance provided with the J1 visa?

I am planning to join internship based cultural exchange program in USA with j1 visa how can i obtain an affordable health insurance? Also what is the difference between internship and traineeship which one should i choose?

Sarah Fields answers:

Most of the j1 visa cultural exchange program providers do include health insurance as a part of their service or you can purchase your own which might be costly to purchase it separately. As for your questions regarding the J1 internship and j1 traineeship;
J1 internship is for students or recent graduates and J1 traineeship is for the professionals how have completed their studies more than a year ago and they should have at least 5 years of experience which is combination of their studies and work experience in the related area. Well good luck with your internship/traineeship. Source below;

Michael asks…

Where can I find the cheapest student health insurance for going to Finland as an exchange student?

I will be going to Finland as an exchange student. I am in United States right now. Where can I find the cheapest health insurance?

Sarah Fields answers:

Your program should offer something. If not, try AAA travel insurance.

Betty asks…

How does high deductible health insurance work ?

After not having any health insurance or major issues for the last 20+ years, and because Im 50 with assets I would prefer not to lose, and because I guess it will become law and involve fines in the future, I went ahead & bought the cheapest plan that Blue Cross of Alabama offers.

$3250 per calender year, then a 20% copay after $3250 u to a $5000 per calender year maximum out of pocket. I think.

And, apparently I get one free Dr visit per year in exchange for my $2088 per year.

My questions:

Do I automatically get BCBSs negotiated rates for Dr’s visits, blood work and expensive medical costs like heart issues ?

How, exactly, does the deductible work in the real world ? That is, if I have a heart attack, is the hospital going to demand that I pay $3250 upfront to cover my deductible or will I be allowed to pay my part over time ?

Apparently, BCBS only covers me for 90 days a time scripts. I prefer to get 6 months at a time because everything I take is cheap anyway (and cheaper 6 months at a time) and I don’t have to worry about refills and running out.

Does that mean that none of ny scripts will count toward my deductible or half will ?

Are both my every 6 month Dr visits covered since I only go because the Dr says I have to in order to get my meds and check my liver fuction & cholesterol levels. (Cholesterol levels are rising as apparently the Zocor isn’t working anymore)

I looked into a health savings account but the the amount they pay .15% is so low, Im not sure its worth bothering.

What kind of tax savings do they provide for a retired person with little income/expenses ? Is using their stupid debit cards required ?

Im relatively healthy but heart disease runs in my family so a heart attack is a near certainty. Only question is when.
$3250 is the highest BCBS of Alabama offers, I would prefer a $10k plan with a lower rate.

The national insurance page shows NOTHING for me. (But, If I was a parasite, Im sure I would get free coverage)

Pretty sure everything counts toward my $3250/5000. But, chances are very high that I will never reach those levels in a single year unless I had a heart attack or other major event.

So I think Im just going to continue paying out of pocket on the scrips for convenience sake.
$3250 is the highest BCBS of Alabama offers, I would prefer a $10k plan with a lower rate.

The national insurance page shows NOTHING for me. (But, If I was a parasite, Im sure I would get free coverage)

Pretty sure everything counts toward my $3250/5000. But, chances are very high that I will never reach those levels in a single year unless I had a heart attack or other major event.

So I think Im just going to continue paying out of pocket on the scrips for convenience sake.

Sarah Fields answers:

You do get the negotiated rates.

For a heart attack, no one pays up front (even if they don’t have insurance), because there is not time. Heart attacks need to be treated immediately. They do not have to allow you to pay over time. They can make you pay the entire deductible at the same time, but it would not be until several weeks after the heart attack, probably longer.

The two visits to the doctor will count toward the deductible. They won’t be covered in full.

You will reach the deductible unless you don’t have even a minor event. Nearly any hospitalization, even if it is just for a broken bone, will cost that much. One day in a hospital can cost over $10,000. A heart attack can cost millions.

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