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Health Insurance Quotes Pa Question & Answers

2015 August 9
by Sarah Fields

Charles asks…

Is Brazil a safe place to spend my vacation?

Sarah Fields answers:

That is a weird question coming from a Brazilian – according to your profile.
Please check the US Department of State advisories for traveling to Brazil, particularly the ones related to crime: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1072.html . That is the recommended website if you are a tourist, no matter whether American or not. In short, Brazil is SAFE but you must heed its advisories.

Quoting from that website:
Brazilian police and media report that the crime rate remains high in most urban centers, including the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, and is also growing in rural areas within those states. Brazil’s murder rate is more than four times higher than that of the United States, and rates for other crimes are similarly high. Criminal convictions for crimes are rare.

Street crime remains a problem for visitors and local residents alike. Foreign tourists, including U.S. Citizens, are often targets, especially in Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, and Recife. While the risk is greater during the evening and at night, street crime also occurs during the day, and safer areas of cities are not immune. Incidents of theft on city buses are frequent. You should keep a copy of your passport with you while in public and keep your passport in a hotel safe or other secure place. You should also carry proof of your health insurance with you.

In May/June 2012, armed groups in Sao Paulo targeted restaurants, robbing patrons during busiest parts of the day. These criminal events are not isolated to one area of the city and target both rich and poor neighborhoods.

The incidence of crime against tourists is greater in areas surrounding beaches, hotels, discotheques, bars, nightclubs, and other tourist destinations and is especially prevalent prior to and during Carnival (Brazilian Mardi Gras), but also occurs throughout the year. Several Brazilian cities have established specialized tourist police units to patrol areas frequented by tourists.

Use caution with regard to evening and night travel through rural areas and satellite cities due to reported incidents of roadside robberies that randomly target passing vehicles. Robberies and “quick-nappings” outside of banks and ATMs occur regularly. In a “quick-napping,” criminals abduct victims for a short time in order to receive a quick payoff from the family, business, or the victim’s ATM card. Some victims have been beaten and/or raped. You should also take precautions to avoid being carjacked, especially in Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Recife, and other cities.

In airports, hotel lobbies, bus stations, and other public places, pick pocketing and the theft of hand-carried luggage and laptop computers are common. You should “dress down” when in public and avoid carrying valuables or wearing jewelry or expensive watches. “Good Samaritan” scams are common. If a tourist looks lost or seems to be having trouble communicating, a seemingly innocent bystander offering help may actually be a participant in a scam. Take care at and around banks and ATMs that take U.S. Credit or debit cards. Travelers using personal ATM or credit cards sometimes receive billing statements with unauthorized charges after returning from a visit to Brazil or have had their cards cloned or duplicated without their knowledge. If you use such payment methods, carefully monitor your banking for the duration of your visit.

While the ability of Brazilian police to help recover stolen property is limited, we strongly advise you to obtain a “boletim de ocorrencia” (police report) at a “delegacia” (police station) if any of your possessions are lost or stolen. This will facilitate your exit from Brazil and assist with insurance claims. Be aware, however, that the police in tourist areas are on the lookout for false reports of theft for purposes of insurance fraud.

Do not buy counterfeit and pirated goods, even if they are widely available. These goods are illegal in the United States, and if you purchase them you may also be breaking local law.

David asks…

Is Brazil a safe place to spend my vacation?

Sarah Fields answers:

That is a weird question coming from a Brazilian – according to your profile.
Please check the US Department of State advisories for traveling to Brazil, particularly the ones related to crime: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1072.html . That is the recommended website if you are a tourist, no matter whether American or not. In short, Brazil is SAFE but you must heed its advisories.

Quoting from that website:
Brazilian police and media report that the crime rate remains high in most urban centers, including the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, and is also growing in rural areas within those states. Brazil’s murder rate is more than four times higher than that of the United States, and rates for other crimes are similarly high. Criminal convictions for crimes are rare.

Street crime remains a problem for visitors and local residents alike. Foreign tourists, including U.S. Citizens, are often targets, especially in Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, and Recife. While the risk is greater during the evening and at night, street crime also occurs during the day, and safer areas of cities are not immune. Incidents of theft on city buses are frequent. You should keep a copy of your passport with you while in public and keep your passport in a hotel safe or other secure place. You should also carry proof of your health insurance with you.

In May/June 2012, armed groups in Sao Paulo targeted restaurants, robbing patrons during busiest parts of the day. These criminal events are not isolated to one area of the city and target both rich and poor neighborhoods.

The incidence of crime against tourists is greater in areas surrounding beaches, hotels, discotheques, bars, nightclubs, and other tourist destinations and is especially prevalent prior to and during Carnival (Brazilian Mardi Gras), but also occurs throughout the year. Several Brazilian cities have established specialized tourist police units to patrol areas frequented by tourists.

Use caution with regard to evening and night travel through rural areas and satellite cities due to reported incidents of roadside robberies that randomly target passing vehicles. Robberies and “quick-nappings” outside of banks and ATMs occur regularly. In a “quick-napping,” criminals abduct victims for a short time in order to receive a quick payoff from the family, business, or the victim’s ATM card. Some victims have been beaten and/or raped. You should also take precautions to avoid being carjacked, especially in Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Recife, and other cities.

In airports, hotel lobbies, bus stations, and other public places, pick pocketing and the theft of hand-carried luggage and laptop computers are common. You should “dress down” when in public and avoid carrying valuables or wearing jewelry or expensive watches. “Good Samaritan” scams are common. If a tourist looks lost or seems to be having trouble communicating, a seemingly innocent bystander offering help may actually be a participant in a scam. Take care at and around banks and ATMs that take U.S. Credit or debit cards. Travelers using personal ATM or credit cards sometimes receive billing statements with unauthorized charges after returning from a visit to Brazil or have had their cards cloned or duplicated without their knowledge. If you use such payment methods, carefully monitor your banking for the duration of your visit.

While the ability of Brazilian police to help recover stolen property is limited, we strongly advise you to obtain a “boletim de ocorrencia” (police report) at a “delegacia” (police station) if any of your possessions are lost or stolen. This will facilitate your exit from Brazil and assist with insurance claims. Be aware, however, that the police in tourist areas are on the lookout for false reports of theft for purposes of insurance fraud.

Do not buy counterfeit and pirated goods, even if they are widely available. These goods are illegal in the United States, and if you purchase them you may also be breaking local law.

Nancy asks…

Health Insurance & Plastic Surgery…Will it be covered?

I reside in PA and have what most would consider great healthcare provided by my parent’s work. My benefits will run out in a few years, when I graduate college. I have large breasts, (34-d) and am planning to at some point in my life get a breast reduction because they are uncomfortable, especially with my small body/stature. Will my Blue Cross/Blue Shield PPO plan cover the cost of the breast reduction surgery?

Sarah Fields answers:

When you call a plastic surgeon’s office to inquire about cost, be certain to ask if each of these fees is included. Often the prices quoted are only the surgeon’s fee, that makes up only 60%-80% of the total cost. It isn’t until you see the plastic surgeon and receive your quote that you find out that the price quoted was significantly lower than the actual cost.
Arm Lift (Brachioplasty) $5000-6500
Blue Peel $500-700
Botox $200-400 per area
Breast Augmentation (saline) $5000-6500
Breast Augmentation(silicone) $6000-8000
Breast Lift $5000-6000
Chin or Cheek Implants $3000-4500
Collagen Injection $500-1500
Deep Chemical Peel $3500-5000
Dermabrasion $2000-4000
Eyelid Tuck (upper & lower) $4000-5500
Face Lift $7000-9000
Forehead Lift (Brow Lift) $3500-5000
Hair Removal (Laser) $300-800
Laser (Erbium) $2500-4000
Laser (CO2) $4000-5000
Lip Augmentation $600-2000
Liposuction (1 area) $2500-4500
Liposuction (3 areas) $5500-7000
Liposuction (5 areas) $8000-10,000
Medium Peel $1500-2500
Micro Peel $60-100
Nose Surgery $5000-6000
Pectoral Implants $6000-7000
Permanent Eyeliner $300-1000
Permanant Lip Liner $300-1000
Spider Vein Rx (Laser) $400-1000
Spider Vein Rx (Sclero) $200-500
Tattoo Removal (Laser) $300-800
Tummy Tuck $6000-8000

Contacting a plastic surgeon is probably the best idea for advice. These sites have a lot of other helpful information…

http://www.san-diego-plastic-surgery-cosmetic-surgery-doctors.us/cosmetic-surgery-san-diego-breast-surgery-article-3.htm

http://www.san-diego-dentist.us/

http://www.medical-research-study-directory.info/san-diego-medical-research-study.htm

http://hoodia-research.blogspot.com

http://www.acne-treatment-medicine-1.info

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